LeftRight

I don’t know much about Goapele, but her sultry voice, and the pulse of this track’s rhythm are undeniably seductive. I’m swaying in my seat as I write this, and my imagination is running wild with sexually charged fantasies. I remember the song having the same effect on me the first time I heard it and it remains to be just as powerful today…


Jason Grimes, owner of Capitol Hill’s most thriving record store, Spin Cycle, turned me on to this album. It’s one of those that I want to play over and over again, but don’t for fear of burning out on it.

Harley Streten self produced this debut album at the fresh age of 21. He’s been making beats in his parent’s basement since his teenage years and his talent makes apparent that he was born to put music out into the world.

Pitchfork gives him a glowing review that I won’t bother attempting to echo.


More appropriately titled A Breathtaking Trip to That Darkside, Alexander Spit does not hide his love for mind altering substances and other subject matter that makes the average listener squirm. His lyrics are sprinkled with references to mushrooms and mali, and his production style takes me back to southern California’s mid nineties horror core, but as if the tracks were recorded at 45 rpm and I’m listening at 33. This kid is weird, and I like it.


I’ve been an Outkast fan for at least a decade, but never really followed Big Boi’s solo career. It wasn’t until a good friend of mine schooled me about the new album that I started to branch out and listen to earlier solo work. I immediately realized how prominent his sound is in my favorite Outkast recordings, and that my thinking of Andre 3000 as the brains behind their success was totally uptight…


Little Sleepwalker is a huge shift from Cecil Frena’s 2011 album, Bodysongs.  The best comparison I can draw is if Passion Pit were suddenly to become Burial.  There are no saccharin vocals or pop beats to be found.  The juxtaposition of dark and melodic qualities is compelling, and the track sequencing comes together to form a nice landscape of peaks and valleys.  It contends to be my favorite electronic album of 2012.


Bootie Bass is a collective of mashup artists originally based out of San Francisco.  I dig them because they make me love pop songs I hate, and make publicly singing along to those guilty pleasures you’d only listen to alone in your car OK.

Less frenetic and geared towards the ADD generation than Girltalk and more energetic than The Hood Internet, their mixes make perfect dancefloor material. There is a monthly at Chop Suey that I will surely be attending on a regular basis moving forward.